City of Madison, Wisconsin | Legislative Information Center
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File #: 54777    Version: Name: Creating the Task Force on PFAS Contamination (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) to review, analyze and provide recommendations for a comprehensive response to PFAS contamination in Madison.
Type: Resolution Status: Report of Officer
File created: 2/19/2019 In control: Council Office
On agenda: 2/26/2019 Final action:
Enactment date: Enactment #:
Title: SECOND SUBSTITUTE - Creating a special joint City-County task force on PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) contamination to review, analyze and provide recommendations for a comprehensive response to PFAS contamination in Madison.
Sponsors: Marsha A. Rummel, Syed Abbas, Samba Baldeh, Shiva Bidar
Attachments: 1. 54777 v1.pdf, 2. 54777 v2.pdf, 3. Written Comments to Water Utility Board 3-26-2019.pdf, 4. 2019 Bill_Senator Mark Miller.pdf
Fiscal Note
The proposed resolution creates a Joint City-County Task Force on PFAS Contamination (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) to be a clearinghouse to review, analyze and provide recommendations for a comprehensive response to PFAS contamination in Madison. While there may be recommendations in the report with future fiscal implications, no appropriation is required at this time.
Title
SECOND SUBSTITUTE - Creating a special joint City-County task force on PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) contamination to review, analyze and provide recommendations for a comprehensive response to PFAS contamination in Madison.
Body
WHEREAS, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of approximately 5000 synthetic chemicals, that include PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) and PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate), that have been used in numerous industries since its introduction by DuPont in 1938. The chemicals are persistent in the environment and in the human body and do not break down, meaning that they can accumulate over time; and,

WHEREAS, PFAS have been used for decades in firefighting foams, as commercial stain repellants in products like carpet and fabric, as a coating for nonstick cookware, and in consumer products such as fast food wrappers and dental floss; and,

WHEREAS, there are four major sources of PFAS: fire training/fire response sites, industrial sites, landfills, and wastewater treatment plants/biosolids where there is some primary source of PFAS that discharges to wastewater treatment plants and landfills; and,

WHEREAS, impacts of PFAS on human health are only now becoming known. These chemicals can easily migrate into the air, dust, food, soil and water and can accumulate in the body. These chemicals have been linked to adverse human health effects including low fertility, high cholesterol, immune system deficiencies, kidney and liver disease, risk of several types of cancer and stunted development of children and fetuses; and,

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