City of Madison, Wisconsin | Legislative Information Center
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File #: 32190    Version: 1 Name: Honoring the Marquette-Williamson Neigh
Type: Resolution Status: Passed
File created: 11/13/2013 In control: COMMON COUNCIL
On agenda: 11/19/2013 Final action: 11/19/2013
Enactment date: 11/20/2013 Enactment #: RES-13-00837
Title: Honoring the Marquette-Williamson Neighborhood and Marquette Neighborhood Association as a 2013 Great Places in America by the American Planning Association
Sponsors: Paul R. Soglin, Marsha A. Rummel
Date Ver.Action ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsWatch
11/19/20131 COMMON COUNCIL Adopt Under Suspension of Rules 2.04, 2.05, 2.24, and 2.25Pass Action details Meeting details Not available
11/13/20131 Department of Planning and Community and Economic Development RECOMMEND TO COUNCIL TO ADOPT UNDER SUSPENSION OF RULES 2.04, 2.05, 2.24, & 2.25 - REPORT OF OFFICER  Action details Meeting details Not available
Fiscal Note
No appropriation is required.
Title
Honoring the Marquette-Williamson Neighborhood and Marquette Neighborhood Association as a 2013 Great Places in America by the American Planning Association
Body
PREAMBLE
Located on Madison’s Isthmus between Lake Mendota and Lake Monona, the Marquette Neighborhood, whose settlement began in 1857, is one of Madison’s oldest neighborhoods.

During the 1960s and 1970s classic symptoms of central city deterioration and the urban renewal mindset that was characteristic of the time threatened Marquette’s assets. Middle class flight, absentee ownership, demolition, commuter traffic, school closure, and even a freeway proposed to run through the East Rail Corridor were among the challenges facing the residents, but they took a stand.

In 1968, residents formed the Marquette Neighborhood Association (MNA). After their formation, MNA championed efforts to garner input from residents, the business community and major stakeholders to better understand the values of the community. The plan that resulted from this effort guides the private and public sector to preserve, restore, and improve the Marquette Neighborhood to this day. Marquette’s efforts were far ahead of national trends and helped shape a new era of place-based planning.

Today, 45 years later, Marquette’s renaissance is evident in the locally owned shops, restaurants and live music venues that occupy previously vacant spaces on Williamson Street. Former factories now house startup incubators signaling a post-industrial rebirth of imagination and creativity, and a home-grown entrepreneurial energy prevails. Local art installations, music festivals, Little Free Libraries, express the spirit of an engaged community and the authentic, organic character that results from connection and tenure.

Carfree living is not only possible, but it is an attractive option in Marquette with its rich network of detached sidewalks, bike trails, transit routes and grid of stree...

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