City of Madison, Wisconsin | Legislative Information Center
Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
File #: 26893    Version: 1 Name: Accepting the report of the Emerald Ash Borer Taskforce and adopting the recommendations contained therein.
Type: Resolution Status: Passed
File created: 6/27/2012 In control: BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017)
On agenda: 9/18/2012 Final action: 9/18/2012
Enactment date: 9/20/2012 Enactment #: RES-12-00729
Title: Accepting the report of the Emerald Ash Borer Taskforce and adopting the recommendations contained therein.
Sponsors: Paul R. Soglin, Joseph R. Clausius, Mark Clear, Paul E. Skidmore, Marsha A. Rummel, Michael E. Verveer
Attachments: 1. 2012 June EAB Plan Final.pdf, 2. EAB Report_Family Genus Species summary (2012).pdf, 3. Final Revised EAB Taskforce Executive Summary 092012.pdf
Date Ver.Action ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsWatch
9/18/20121 COMMON COUNCIL Adopt with the Recommendation(s)Pass Action details Meeting details Not available
9/10/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) RECOMMEND TO COUNCIL WITH THE FOLLOWING RECOMMENDATIONS - REPORT OF OFFICERPass Action details Meeting details Not available
9/6/20121 SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE (ended 3/2020) Return to Lead with the Recommendation for ApprovalPass Action details Meeting details Not available
8/9/20121 BOARD OF HEALTH FOR MADISON AND DANE COUNTY Return to Lead with the Recommendation for ApprovalPass Action details Meeting details Not available
7/25/20121 BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS Return to Lead with the Recommendation for ApprovalPass Action details Meeting details Not available
7/24/20121 WATER UTILITY BOARD Return to Lead with the Recommendation for ApprovalPass Action details Meeting details Not available
7/16/20121 COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT (ended 6/2020) Return to Lead with the Following Recommendation(s)Pass Action details Meeting details Not available
7/11/20121 BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS Return to Lead with the Following Recommendation(s)Pass Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 BOARD OF ESTIMATES (ended 4/2017) Refer  Action details Meeting details Not available
7/3/20121 COMMON COUNCIL Referred  Action details Meeting details Not available
6/27/20121 Parks Division Referred for Introduction  Action details Meeting details Not available
Fiscal Note
Current estimates indicate that the population of Madison's terrace (between street and sidewalk) ash trees stands at approximately 21,700, representing over 24% of total terrace trees. Many thousands of ash trees also live in parks and greenways and on private property. The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has not yet been detected in Dane County, but was recently discovered in Janesville, approximately 28 air miles away. Although the insect spreads at a rate of only 0.5 to 0.6 miles per year under natural conditions, the infestation has made irregular and unpredictable leaps via the transmission of infested wood and nursery stock. Several months ago, the nearest known infestation was at Rock Cut State Park in Illinois, slightly more than 60 miles away.
When the EAB arrives, insect populations will initially build very slowly, but will later increase rapidly as the number of infested trees grows. At peak infestation levels, many trees will decline and die within one or two years. The infestation would eventually prove fatal to all City ash trees, as no North American ash trees have any natural resistance.
The EAB can be expected to cause significant economic difficulties for the City of Madison. Costs for removing and replacing the entire terrace ash tree population are estimated at $13,100,000, incurred over a period of years. Alternatively, chemical treatments of the terrace ash population are an option. However, it is estimated that these treatments would carry an annual cost of over $437,000 for many years. As the ash population gradually expires, treatment costs would slowly drop and eventually disappear entirely. However, terrace ash trees can be expected to live from 30 to 40 years, and the planting of such trees was only discontinued in 2006. Although the total number of ash trees would slowly fall over time due to natural attrition, smaller trees at the same time become larger and consequently more expensive to treat. As the current ...

Click here for full text